Comcast Wants You To Be Amazed That Offline Games Have No Lag On Xfinity Service

Originally posted on Game Politics

We have all had problems with lag. That annoying phenomenon that results in your character continuing to run on your screen but standing perfectly still, and thus a sitting duck, on the screens of your opponents. However, there is one place we don’t normally see lag, games without an online component.

Comcast is hoping that the gamers they are targeting with their latest Xfinity advertising campaign don’t know that. In what appears to be a booth at a mall, they pull in gamers to ask if they experience lag and then have them try a game. The ever so helpful Comcast salesman asks the gamers if they notice any buffering, to which the gamers reply they don’t. Why? Because they are playing Trials Fusion by Ubisoft, a game with no online mode.

Mr. Comcast gets the gamers playing Trials Fusion. The game is indeed a shiny new title, released on PC and for the major gaming consoles (Xbox 360, Xbox One, and PlayStation 4) just a few weeks ago. The motorcycle tricks-and-racing game launched to generally positive reviews that lauded its mechanics and features. But reviewers also mentioned one notable feature that the game does not have: an online multiplayer mode.

No online mode, no net connection. No network connection, no network lag.

“Do you notice any buffering?” Mr. Comcast then asks.

The gamers happily reply that they do not!

So I guess the moral of this story is, if you don’t want your offline games to lag, then get Xfinity. Else, get the best, or most likely only, option for high speed internet in your area.

Source - Reddit via Consumerist via Techdirt

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Super Podcast Action Committee – Episode 99

Super Podcast Action CommitteeOn this week’s show hosts Andrew Eisen and E. Zachary Knight discuss whether the unbundling of the Kinect will help Xbox One sales, the NPD Group’s latest report on core gamer trends, and ISPs threatening to take their ball and go home if net neutrality passes. Download Episode 99 now: SuperPAC Episode 99(1 hour, 5 minutes) 75 MB.

As always, you can subscribe to the show on iTunes and use our RSS Feed to add the show to your favorite news reader. You can also find us on Facebook, on Twitter @SuperPACPodcast and Google +. You can send us feedback on the show by dropping a note to superpacpodcast@gmail.com.

Credits: The Super Podcast Action Committee is hosted by E. Zachary Knight and Andrew Eisen, and produced by James Fudge. The show is edited by Jose Betancourt. Music in the show includes “Albino” by Brian Boyko and “Barroom Ballet” by Kevin MacLeod. Both are in thepublic domain and free to use. ECA bumper created by Andrew Eisen.

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Super Podcast Action Committee – Episode 98

Super Podcast Action CommitteeOn this week’s show hosts Andrew Eisen and E. Zachary Knight discuss the latest GamePolitics Poll results (should Kickstarter adopt an equity-based investment model?), the webhosting service that dared to throttle the FCC, the national Reason-Rupe poll about gaming, and the Tomodachi Life controversy. Download Episode 98 now: SuperPAC Episode 98 (1 hour, 8 minutes) 78 MB.

As always, you can subscribe to the show on iTunes and use our RSS Feed to add the show to your favorite news reader. You can also find us on Facebook, on Twitter@SuperPACPodcast and Google +. You can send us feedback on the show by dropping a note to superpacpodcast@gmail.com.

Credits: The Super Podcast Action Committee is hosted by E. Zachary Knight and Andrew Eisen, and produced by James Fudge. The show is edited by Jose Betancourt. Music in the show includes “Albino” by Brian Boyko and “Barroom Ballet” by Kevin MacLeod. Both are in the public domain and free to use. ECA bumper created by Andrew Eisen.

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Are Tax Breaks For Game Developers Economically Sound?

Originally published on Game Politics

Throughout the US and around the world, game developers are fighting for tax incentives and breaks similar to those offered to other creative industries such as the movie industry. Many groups such as TIGA in the UK make the claim that such tax breaks are needed in order to compete with other nations for game development talent, competition created in part by the tax breaks and incentives offered in those competing nations.

While these fights for increased tax breaks rage on, one question seems to remain unasked. Are these tax incentives worth the trouble?

In its Video Game Nation coverage, Reason asks that very question.

Under the Texas Moving Image Industry Incentive Program, the Lone Star state has set aside $95 million in funds over the next two years toward grants for both filmmakers and developers—making it the largest incentive program in the nation. And so far it seems to be working. Texas is now only second to California when it comes to video game employment.

But are these subsidies creating enough economic growth to justify their cost? [Calvin H. Johnson, professor of law at the University of Texas at Austin], who specializes in tax law, thinks that video game makers are enjoying a tax deal that’s too good to be true.

“If you’re going to double the rate of return for federal subsidies then you really ought to have a good justification that the public is getting a benefit equal to that incredibly intense incentive,” Johnson states. “And I must admit, I’m not convinced that the unemployed son spending 17 hours in the basement of his mother’s house working on his Doom 3 is making a grand contribution.”

While Johnson’s example of one potential recipient of these tax incentives seems a bit… ignorant, his main point does make some sense. Is the public getting a valid and worthwhile return on their investments in these programs? This is a very interesting question to ask, especially at a time when the Federal government and many state governments are operating under deficits in their budgets.

Source: Reason.com

Game Politics Contributor: E. Zachary Knight

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Gamers More Likely To Consider Themselves Independent And Support A Variety Of Policies Based On Free Choice

Gamers are more Independent and less Republican than non-gamers.Originally posted on Game Politics

It might not come to a big surprise for many of you, but gamers are less likely to be conservative than non-gamers and more likely to use products and services that many politicians want banned.

The two most recent Reason-Rupe polls show that gamers are more likely to consider themselves independent in their political views. The polls show that 55% of frequent gamers consider themselves independent while 30% consider themselves Democratic and 15% Republican.

The polls also show that gamers support a wide variety of activities and products including buying energy drinks (84%), online gambling (71%), legalizing marijuana (62%) and using Bitcoin (55%). Of all the listed activities on the poll, the only notable exception to this is with 3D printed guns. Only 42% of gamers support the printing of guns at home.

Gamers also have a less favorable view of the police actions than non-gamers. 72% of gamers feel that giving the police drones and military equipment goes too far. Additionally, 63% of gamers feel that the police are not properly held accountable for their actions.

Source - Reason.com

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Super Podcast Action Committee – Episode 97

Super Podcast Action CommitteeOn this week’s show hosts Andrew Eisen and E. Zachary Knight are joined by special guest Jason D’Aprile to discuss whether ‘gaming addiction’ should be an officially recognized addiction by mental health professional around the globe, Turtle Rock’s community manager getting fired for talking about disgraced LA Clippers owner Donald Sterling on Twitter, and a whole lot more. Download Episode 97 now: SuperPAC Episode 97 (1 hour, 8 minutes) 78 MB.

As always, you can subscribe to the show on iTunes and use our RSS Feed to add the show to your favorite news reader. You can also find us on Facebook, on Twitter@SuperPACPodcast and Google +. You can send us feedback on the show by dropping a note to superpacpodcast@gmail.com.

Credits: The Super Podcast Action Committee is hosted by E. Zachary Knight and Andrew Eisen, and produced by James Fudge. The show is edited by Jose Betancourt. Music in the show includes “Albino” by Brian Boyko and “Barroom Ballet” by Kevin MacLeod. Both are in the public domain and free to use. ECA bumper created by Andrew Eisen.

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Super Podcast Action Committee – Episode 96

Super Podcast Action CommitteeOn this week’s show hosts Andrew Eisen and E. Zachary Knight discuss the latest poll on GamePolitics (how do you divvy up your Humble Bundle payments), FCC Chairman Tom Wheeler and net neutrality, the ‘New Essential Facts on Video Game Industry’ report from the ESA, China’s restrictions on game content released in the country, and the horrible story of a Call of Duty player who called a SWAT team on an opponent. Download Episode 96 now: SuperPAC Episode 96 (1 hour, 14 minutes) 85 MB.

As always, you can subscribe to the show on iTunes and use our RSS Feed to add the show to your favorite news reader. You can also find us on Facebook, on Twitter @SuperPACPodcast andGoogle +. You can send us feedback on the show by dropping a note tosuperpacpodcast@gmail.com.

Credits: The Super Podcast Action Committee is hosted by E. Zachary Knight and Andrew Eisen, and produced by James Fudge. The show is edited by Jose Betancourt. Music in the show includes “Albino” by Brian Boyko and “Barroom Ballet” by Kevin MacLeod. Both are in the public domainand free to use. ECA bumper created by Andrew Eisen.

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Super Podcast Action Committee – Episode 95

Super Podcast Action CommitteeOn this week’s show hosts Andrew Eisen and E. Zachary Knight discuss whether politicians should face the death penalty when convicted of a crime, the Dragon Age Inquisitor controversy related to ‘on disc’ DLC, Target recommending “M” rated games for children as Easter presents, and video game studies with no control groups. Download Episode 95 now: SuperPAC Episode 95 (1 hour, 7 minutes) 76.5 MB.

As always, you can subscribe to the show on iTunes and use our RSS Feed to add the show to your favorite news reader. You can also find us on Facebook, on Twitter@SuperPACPodcast and Google +. You can send us feedback on the show by dropping a note to superpacpodcast@gmail.com.

Credits: The Super Podcast Action Committee is hosted by E. Zachary Knight and Andrew Eisen, and produced by James Fudge. The show is edited by Jose Betancourt. Music in the show includes “Albino” by Brian Boyko and “Barroom Ballet” by Kevin MacLeod. Both are in the public domain and free to use. ECA bumper created by Andrew Eisen.

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Super Podcast Action Committee – Episode 94

Super Podcast Action CommitteeOn this week’s show hosts Andrew Eisen and E. Zachary Knight discuss how Facebook buying Oculus VR could affect the technology’s future development, if politicians who commit crimes should suffer stiffer punishments (including the death penalty), and Amazon’s foray into the set-top box/ micro-console space with Fire TV. Download Episode 94 now:SuperPAC Episode 94 (1 hour, 2 minutes) 71.2 MB.

As always, you can subscribe to the show on iTunes and use our RSS Feed to add the show to your favorite news reader. You can also find us on Facebook, on Twitter @SuperPACPodcast and Google +. You can send us feedback on the show by dropping a note to superpacpodcast@gmail.com.

Credits: The Super Podcast Action Committee is hosted by E. Zachary Knight and Andrew Eisen, and produced by James Fudge. The show is edited by Jose Betancourt. Music in the show includes “Albino” by Brian Boyko and “Barroom Ballet” by Kevin MacLeod. Both are in the public domainand free to use. ECA bumper created by Andrew Eisen.

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Super Podcast Action Committee – Episode 93

Super Podcast Action CommitteeOn this week’s show hosts Andrew Eisen and E. Zachary Knight are joined by Jeremy Powers to discuss suspended California Senator Leland Yee’s legal troubles for charges including illegal gun running, corruption, and bribery; and Facebook buying Oculus Rift. It’s fun for the whole family! Download Episode 93 now: SuperPAC Episode 93 (1 hour, 13 minutes) 67.6 MB.

As always, you can subscribe to the show on iTunes and use our RSS Feed to add the show to your favorite news reader. You can also find us on Facebook, on Twitter @SuperPACPodcast and Google +. You can send us feedback on the show by dropping a note tosuperpacpodcast@gmail.com.

Credits: The Super Podcast Action Committee is hosted by E. Zachary Knight and Andrew Eisen, and produced by James Fudge. The show is edited by Jose Betancourt. Music in the show includes “Albino” by Brian Boyko and “Barroom Ballet” by Kevin MacLeod. Both are in thepublic domain and free to use. ECA bumper created by Andrew Eisen.

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