Posts Tagged Capcom

Super Podcast Action Committee – Episode 89

Super Podcast Action CommitteeOn this week’s show hosts Andrew Eisen and E. Zachary Knight talk about the latest GamePolitics poll (Will King be in the running for the Consumerist’s Worst Company in America tournament?) , the trend towards consumers choosing digital games over retail game discs, and Capcom’s response to offering more gender options for the main character in Deep Down. Download Episode 89 now: SuperPAC Episode 89 (1 hour, 7 minutes) 76.9 MB.

As always, you can subscribe to the show on iTunes and use our RSS Feed to add the show to your favorite news reader. You can also find us on Facebook, on Twitter@SuperPACPodcast and Google +. You can send us feedback on the show by dropping a note to superpacpodcast@gmail.com.

Credits: The Super Podcast Action Committee is hosted by E. Zachary Knight and Andrew Eisen, and produced by James Fudge. The show is edited by Jose Betancourt. Music in the show includes “Albino” by Brian Boyko and “Barroom Ballet” by Kevin MacLeod. Both are in the public domain and free to use. ECA bumper created by Andrew Eisen.

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Super Podcast Action Committee – Episode 72

Super Podcast Action Committee

On this week’s show, hosts Andrew Eisen and E. Zachary Knight are joined by Ben Hayward, who wrote aninteresting article last week about how video game players are often gun owners too, and how the government often tries to pit one group against the other. Andrew also reveals the results of last week’s poll concerning the Mighty No. 9 and the possibility that they might get sued by Capcom. Download Episode 72 now: SuperPAC Episode 72 (1 hour, 38 minutes) 45.1 MB.

As always, you can subscribe to the show on iTunes and use our RSS Feed to add the show to your favorite news reader. You can also find us on Facebook, on Twitter @SuperPACPodcastand Google +. You can send us feedback on the show by dropping a note tosuperpacpodcast@gmail.com.

Credits: The Super Podcast Action Committee is hosted by E. Zachary Knight and Andrew Eisen, and produced by James Fudge. The show is edited by Jose Betancourt. Music in the show includes “Albino” by Brian Boyko and “Barroom Ballet” by Kevin MacLeod. Both are in thepublic domain and free to use. ECA bumper created by Andrew Eisen.

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Capcom Can No Longer Make New Tatsunoko Games

Tatsunoko vs CapcomOriginally Published on Game Politics.

Sad news for Capcom vs Tatsunoko fans. Capcom no longer holds the rights to publish games using the Tatsunoko properties. In response to a forum post about playing the game on the Wii U, Christian Svensson, Corporate Officer/Senior Vice-President, stated that Capcom won’t be making any more.

Our rights with Tatsunoko have lapsed fairly recently (so we’re no longer allowed to sell the title physically or digitally). Unless Japan were to strike a new deal, I’d say the chances of this happening are slim.

While this does mean that no new games will come from the series, you will still be able to play and buy existing copies. However, if you like buying games new, you will need to pick it up now, while supplies last.

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Capcom Complains About Gamers Accessing Content On The Disk

One of the things that the internet and connected gaming consoles has brought us is the prospect of expanding the core game with additional content. This is a really cool thing that for the longest time was only available on the PC or through expensive expansion packs. But now that we can download content to consoles, we are able to extend the life of the games we love.

Unfortunately, not everything is roses and sunshine in this world. Some game companies are abusing this ability by stripping content from the main game and selling it off as DLC. Some companies are even so lazy that they don’t even bother removing the content from the retail game before shipping it off. Capcom is one of the offenders. Recently, Capcom released Street Fighter x Tekken with a download pack of characters for gamers to buy at an additional cost. However, some resourceful gamers were able to find out that those characters are contained on the retail disk. No download is required other than to unlock them for play. Some even more resourceful gamers have found a way to hack into the game and access those characters without having to pay for them. This has not made Capcom happy and they are looking at means of punishing those players.

“In any event, we already have opened channels of communication with Microsoft on these issues Friday night. If you can capture screens or video of this in action (as some have already) we’re working on bans for boxes and accounts with Microsoft for haxxors.”

Here is my problem with this move. Capcom has set these characters aside in order to make some extra money selling them as DLC. Yet, it was not concerned enough to completely remove the characters from the main game. Now they are mad that people are playing characters that are already on the disk the people have paid for.

An analogy I used over at GamePolitics was that of buying a house that had two rooms and the garage sealed off with the prospect that you should pay extra money on top of what you had already paid to get access to those rooms. No one would think bad of you or pursue legal action against you for tearing down the barriers and accessing those rooms. Yet, for some reason a similar move in the software world can get you fined or thrown in jail for accessing content that is on the disk you bought. You can thank the DMCA’s anti-circumvention clause for that lovely scenario.

What I have to say to Capcom is this, “Boo freaking hoo.” Really, I can’t think of anything more to say. Capcom made its bed and must now lie in it. If it doesn’t want people accessing additional content they are supposed to pay for, they should sell it completely separate from the retail game. If not, they should stop throwing a fit when they see people gaining access to it.

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