Posts Tagged ESRB

Super Podcast Action Committee – Episode 110

If you missed last week’s live broadcast of Super Podcast Action Committee (Episode 110), you can watch the video replay onYouTube or download it below. On this week’s show hosts Andrew Eisen and E. Zachary Knight discuss Rise of the Tomb Raider’s Xbox exclusivity (20:35), the Night Trap HD Kickstarter and ESRB rating (28:32), Tekken 7′s producer soliciting fans for feedback on Middle Eastern character design (47:34), Microsoft saying it’s still gung ho on the Kinect (52:48), and the accusations by some conservatives that Battlefield: Hardline is aiming its political guns at the Tea Party (1:07:02).

You can grab an audio version of the show on iTunes or at the link below:

SuperPAC Episode 110 (1 hour, 23 minutes) 105 MB (the show was live so it is made available in its raw, unedited format).

As always, you can subscribe to the show on iTunes and use our RSS Feed to add the show to your favorite news reader. You can also find us on Facebook, on Twitter @SuperPACPodcastand Google +. You can send us feedback on the show by dropping a note tosuperpacpodcast@gmail.com.

Credits: The Super Podcast Action Committee is hosted by E. Zachary Knight and Andrew Eisen, and produced by James Fudge. Music in the show includes “Albino” by Brian Boyko and “Barroom Ballet” by Kevin MacLeod. Both are in the public domain and free to use. ECA bumper created by Andrew Eisen.

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Super Podcast Action Committee – Episode 45

Super Podcast Action CommitteeOn this week’s show we talk about Congressman Frank Wolf’s hearing this week to slam video game violence, changes being made to the ESRB, the ESA’s plan for a PSA campaign, the latest SimCity news, and the results of the latest GamePolitics poll. Download Episode 45 now: SuperPAC Episode 45 (1 hour, 12 minutes) 66.6 MB.

As always, you can subscribe to the show on iTunes and use our RSS Feed to add the show to your favorite news reader. You can also find us on Facebook, on Twitter @SuperPACPodcast and Google +. You can send us feedback on the show by dropping a note to superpacpodcast@gmail.com.

Credits: The Super Podcast Action Committee is hosted by E. Zachary Knight and Andrew Eisen, and produced by James Fudge. Music in the show includes “Albino” by Brian Boyko and “Barroom Ballet” by Kevin MacLeod. Both are in the public domain and free to use. ECA bumper created by Andrew Eisen.

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Super Podcast Action Committee – Episode 20

Super Podcast Action CommitteeIn Episode 20 hosts Andrew Eisen and E. Zachary Knight throw all conventional limitations on time out the window as they discuss the “Adults Only” ESRB game ratings category, political ads in games, and all the news last week about the Wii U. Download it now: SuperPAC Episode 20 (1 hour, 27 minutes).

As always, you can subscribe to the show on iTunes and use our RSS Feed to add the show to your favorite news reader. You can also find us onFacebook (where there’s an app that will let you listen to the show), and on Twitter @SuperPACPodcast. You can send us feedback on the show by dropping a note to superpacpodcast@gmail.com.

Credits: The Super Podcast Action Committee is hosted by E. Zachary Knight and Andrew Eisen, and produced by James Fudge. Music in the show includes “Albino” by Brian Boyko and “Barroom Ballet” by Kevin MacLeod. Both are in the public domain and free to use.

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ESRB Partners With CTIA To Bring Us Mobile Game Ratings

ESRB RatingsLast week the Entertainment Software Ratings Board brought new that it was partnering with the Cellular Telecommunications Industry Association in order to bring game ratings to mobile games, something that had been missing for some time now. Today they finally announced details of the deal.

With this new deal, mobile game developers will be able to get an official ESRB rating to display with their games and marketing materials. The ratings are free to get and are completely voluntary. So there is no real issue of any coercion on the part of developers. This can be a great service for many mobile phone users, especially those who have kids.

This move follows an earlier move this year to bring low cost and automated ratings process to developers with limited budgets. That move allowed developers who make games for the PC or downloadable console services to get a rating without the need to have financial backing of a publisher.

What is interesting to me is just how late in the game the ESRB is to the mobile ratings game. With the announcement, the ESRB listed a bunch of mobile phone providers which have partnered with them, but Google and Apple are not part of them. This isn’t really surprising as both of those companies have already been using self created and assigned ratings for quite some time. Had this move come 2 or more years ago, the ESRB might have been able to get them on board.

Sadly, without Apple and Google on board for these ratings, the ESRB is really locked out of the two biggest mobile markets. This will severely damage their ability to gain a large market share in app ratings. While a developer can display ESRB ratings in those markets nothing in those app stores will be tied to it in any way. Game developer will still need to be assigned a rating by Apple and Google to work with filters and age gates.

While I support the ESRB in this new endeavor, this unfortunately shows once again its inability to shift with changes in the gaming climate. When it is not in a reactionary position, such as with the ‘Hot Coffee’ fiasco, it is evolving slowly.  It takes way too much time to make necessary changes to its ratings process and even the ratings themselves. It really needs to be more proactive in changes in the gaming landscape in order to retain its relevancy outside console gaming.

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