Super Podcast Action Committee – Episode 81

Super Podcast Action Committee After a two week hiatus (thanks mostly to the holidays and Andrew’s self-imposed exile to a small town in Kentucky) we return with Super Podcast Action Committee Episode 81! On this week’s show hosts Andrew Eisen and E. Zachary Knight talk about the Killer Instinct DRM that popped up during a recent competition at a NYC college, the EFF’s annual Wish List, and investors suing EA over the shaky Battlefield 4 launch. Download Episode 81 now: SuperPAC Episode 81 (1 hour, 17 minutes) 88.4 MB.

As always, you can subscribe to the show on iTunes and use our RSS Feed to add the show to your favorite news reader. You can also find us on Facebook, on Twitter@SuperPACPodcast and Google +. You can send us feedback on the show by dropping a note to superpacpodcast@gmail.com.

Credits: The Super Podcast Action Committee is hosted by E. Zachary Knight and Andrew Eisen, and produced by James Fudge. The show is edited by Jose Betancourt. Music in the show includes “Albino” by Brian Boyko and “Barroom Ballet” by Kevin MacLeod. Both are in the public domain and free to use. ECA bumper created by Andrew Eisen.

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Five Best Games of 2013: Ouya Edition

Ouya at Retail

I don’t play nearly as many games as I would have liked this year. I rarely do. But one thing I did do was play a whole lot (maybe not that many) Ouya games. I was really excited about the Ouya when the Kickstarter launched. I backed it. I waited most patiently for the console to arrive, even if it was a little later than expected but nearly as late as some people like to claim.

Since late June, I tried to play as many games on the system as I possibly could. And I certainly have some favorites. So here they are in no particular order. Read the rest of this entry »

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66% Of Americans Think Government Should Allow Violent Games

Reason-Rupe Public Opinion SurveyOriginally Published on Game Politics.

Good news for fans of violent games. A large majority of Americans are keen on getting the government out of the business of blocking violent games from being played. You may recall that for many years, various state and the Federal governments had been attempting to regulate violent games in some way. These efforts peaked with the landmark Brown vs EMA Supreme Court case that set the record that video games are protected by the First Amendment.

It seems that all this effort has resulted in a society that is more accepting of violent games than many politicians had hoped. A recent Reason-Rupe poll ask respondents the following question:

Do you think the government should prohibit people from playing violent video games, or should the government allow people to do this?

Reason-Rupe Poll Results By DemographicOf those who responded to the question, 66% responded that the government should allow people to play violent video games. Perhaps not surprisingly, the amount of support for violent games corresponds to the respondent’s age. The older the respondent is, the more likely they are to respond that the government should prohibit the play of violent games with 50% of those over 65 supporting prohibition versus 47% opposed.

The amount of time spent playing games also has a strong impact on how a person responds to this question. According to Reason, those who have never played video games are more likely to support prohibition than those who say they play games regularly.

When it comes to marital status, things are a bit more mixed up. While both married and unmarried women supported allowing violent game play by 64%, unmarried women were slightly more likely to support prohibition than married women. With men, those who were married were a lot more likely to support prohibition of violent game play than unmarried men (31% to 15% respectively).

When it comes to political leanings, those who identified as Libertarian and Republican were most likely to support allowing people to play violent video games, while those identifying as Democratic were slightly less likely to support allowing it. All were in strong support of allowing it.

While I do take some issue with the wording of the question, the overall results are hard to get upset about. My specific concern is that the question implies that the government has the authority to prohibit games by default. Rather, as the Supreme Court noted, games of all types are allowed by default unless the government can produce a compelling case for why specific games should be prohibited, something no government has been able to do in regards to game violence.

Source: Reason.com

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Senator Coburn Targets Games Among Other Programs In His Wastebook 2013 Report

Senator CoburnOriginally published on Game Politics.

Every year, Senator Tom Coburn of Oklahoma publishes a list of government programs which he feels wastes tax payer money and government resources called the Wastebook. While he tops the list of wasted tax payer money with a jab at Congress itself, it is when you get into the rest of the document that you find some rather interesting spending programs. In his opening statement to the report, Coburn writes:

Confronted with self-imposed budget cuts necessary to trim years of trillion dollar shortfalls, Washington protested that it could not live within its means. It attempted to take hostage the symbols of America to exact ransom from taxpayers. Public tours of the White House were canceled and Medicare payments for seniors’ health care were cut.

While the President and his cabinet issued dire warnings about the cataclysmic impacts of sequestration, taxpayers were not alerted to all the waste being spared from the budget axe.

Many of these are your typical government waste, such as bridges to nowhere, duplicated programs and agencies, or unused buildings which cost money to maintain. Yet, he highlights many other programs that many taxpayers may not be aware of even in a general sense. Some of these include funding for video games. Read the rest of this entry »

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Super Podcast Action Committee – Episode 80

Super Podcast Action CommitteeOn this week’s show hosts Andrew Eisen and E. Zachary Knight talk about the latest GamePolitics poll (do you miss game cartridges?), a man tricked into buying a picture of an Xbox One on eBay, Michael Pachter’s disparaging remarks about Nintendo’s president, and Play.com’s prediction that the Wii U will win the holiday sales war. Download Episode 80 now: SuperPAC Episode 80 (1 hour, 4 minutes) 73 MB.

As always, you can subscribe to the show on iTunes and use our RSS Feed to add the show to your favorite news reader. You can also find us on Facebook, on Twitter@SuperPACPodcast and Google +. You can send us feedback on the show by dropping a note to superpacpodcast@gmail.com.

Credits: The Super Podcast Action Committee is hosted by E. Zachary Knight and Andrew Eisen, and produced by James Fudge. The show is edited by Jose Betancourt. Music in the show includes “Albino” by Brian Boyko and “Barroom Ballet” by Kevin MacLeod. Both are in the public domain and free to use. ECA bumper created by Andrew Eisen.

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Super Podcast Action Committee – Episode 79

Super Podcast Action CommitteeOn this week’s show hosts Andrew Eisen and E. Zachary Knight talk about the latest GamePolitics poll, players being banned from the video and chat services one Xbox One and the PS4, the preliminary Sandy Hook Elementary School shooting report, and Scale Labs claiming copyright on all those Walking Dead videos. Download Episode 79 now:SuperPAC Episode 78 (1 hour, 5 minutes) 75 MB.

As always, you can subscribe to the show on iTunes and use our RSS Feed to add the show to your favorite news reader. You can also find us on Facebook, on Twitter@SuperPACPodcast and Google +. You can send us feedback on the show by dropping a note to superpacpodcast@gmail.com.

Credits: The Super Podcast Action Committee is hosted by E. Zachary Knight and Andrew Eisen, and produced by James Fudge. The show is edited by Jose Betancourt. Music in the show includes “Albino” by Brian Boyko and “Barroom Ballet” by Kevin MacLeod. Both are in the public domain and free to use. ECA bumper created by Andrew Eisen.

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Super Podcast Action Committee – Episode 78

Super Podcast Action CommitteeOn this week’s show hosts Andrew Eisen and E. Zachary Knight talk about the latest GamePolitics poll, the Xbox One 4 launch, the latest GamePolitics Letters to the Editor, and the controversial game about the Sandy Hook Elementary School shootings that happened almost a year ago. Download Episode 78 now: SuperPAC Episode 78 (1 hour, 18 minutes) 71.2 MB.

As always, you can subscribe to the show on iTunes and use our RSS Feed to add the show to your favorite news reader. You can also find us on Facebook, on Twitter@SuperPACPodcast and Google +. You can send us feedback on the show by dropping a note to superpacpodcast@gmail.com.

Credits: The Super Podcast Action Committee is hosted by E. Zachary Knight and Andrew Eisen, and produced by James Fudge. The show is edited by Jose Betancourt. Music in the show includes “Albino” by Brian Boyko and “Barroom Ballet” by Kevin MacLeod. Both are in the public domain and free to use. ECA bumper created by Andrew Eisen.

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Super Podcast Action Committee – Episode 77

Super Podcast Action CommitteeOn this week’s episode of the Super Podcast Action Committee, hosts Andrew Eisen and E. Zachary Knight talk about the latest GamePolitics poll, the PlayStation 4 launch, SimCity, and Nintendo’s decision to shut down SwapNote. Download Episode 77 now: SuperPAC Episode 77 (1 hour, 6 minutes) 75.8 MB.

As always, you can subscribe to the show on iTunes and use our RSS Feed to add the show to your favorite news reader. You can also find us on Facebook, on Twitter@SuperPACPodcast and Google +. You can send us feedback on the show by dropping a note to superpacpodcast@gmail.com.

Credits: The Super Podcast Action Committee is hosted by E. Zachary Knight and Andrew Eisen, and produced by James Fudge. The show is edited by Jose Betancourt. Music in the show includes “Albino” by Brian Boyko and “Barroom Ballet” by Kevin MacLeod. Both are in the public domain and free to use. ECA bumper created by Andrew Eisen.

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Why I Am Not Excited About The Next Generation Of Game Consoles

Wii U, XBox One, PS4A new wave of home consoles is upon us. Last year, Nintendo’s successor to the Wii launched in the form of the Wii U. Tomorrow, the Playstation 4 is launching. Next week, the XBox One, this is the third console in the XBox lineup not to be confused with the original XBox, is launching. Yet, I find myself not at all excited about these new consoles.

Despite the best efforts of Sony, Microsoft and Nintendo to wow me with the new shiny, I simply can’t muster up any real excitement for these consoles. Yes, the Wii U is the first high definition console from Nintendo. Yes the PS4 and the XBox One are more powerful and can display bigger and brighter explosions on my TV set. Yet, there is something that they lack. Something that they just can’t compete with. Read the rest of this entry »

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Senator Coburn Responds To Oklahoma Game Developers Concerns Over S 134

Senator CoburnNearly three months ago, a group of game developers and other concerned constituents in Oklahoma sent a joint letter to Senator Tom Coburn, cosponsor of S 134 Violent Content Research Act of 2013. In that letter, they expressed concern over the bill’s sponsor, Senator Rockefeller, and the potential of this bill to lead to further attempts at game regulation.

Senator Coburn responded yesterday to that letter attempting to calm the fears that Senator Rockefeller might bias any studies and that the bill would not add to the current spending levels of the government. Read the rest of this entry »

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